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Hells Angels in Lethbridge: Police co-ordinate public safety response

A group of bikers gather outside an east-end storefront in Toronto on Thursday, July 21, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston A group of bikers gather outside an east-end storefront in Toronto on Thursday, July 21, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston
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Multiple police agencies are working on a co-ordinated response to a gathering in Lethbridge this weekend to mark the establishment of a new Hells Angels chapter in the city.

Lethbridge police said they are working on a strategy with the RCMP, Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team's integrated gang enforcement team, Calgary Police Service, Edmonton Police Service, Medicine Hat Police Service, Taber Police Service, Camrose Police Service and other Canadian police agencies in response to a grand opening party by the outlaw motorcycle gang.

Officials are advising the public about the "highly visible" presence of Hells Angels members, their support clubs and others, who are all expected to ride during various events.

"Their presence is expected to be highly visible and police will assess any potential threat to public safety on a case-by-case basis," police said in a news release.

Police officers will also be visible throughout the city to monitor the Hells Angels members and their activities, which are "well documented" to be involved in criminal activity.

"We will be working with our policing partners to monitor their presence, deter illegal activity and maintain public safety through an overt police presence," said Lethbridge police acting Insp. Pete Christos.

The Hells Angels members are expected to arrive en masse beginning July 12 and police advise the public to be aware of the significant increase in motorcycle traffic and drivers should share the road accordingly.

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