CALGARY -- According to a new survey released by Leger, Albertans are in line with the rest of the country when it comes to feeling optimistic that there's still time to put measures in place to stop climate change.

The survey suggests 75 per cent of Canadians, and nearly 70 per cent of Albertans, feel there is still a chance to reduce the effects.

However, the province is divided when it comes to what those measures look like.

At COP26, Canada announced it will be the first major oil-producing country to cap emissions in an effort to reduce pollution from the oil and gas sector. It also made the goal of having the industry reach net zero by 2050. Alberta’s opinion on this promise is split, with 47 per cent of respondents in support of the idea and 43 per cent opposed.

At the same climate change summit, the federal government announced that it will be ending subsidies that help companies in the oil and gas sector expand their operations outside of the country. According to the report, the subsidies add up to $8 billion in annual support. Across Canada, the survey found 61 per cent of people agree that the subsidies should stop by the end of the year. Quebec boasted the highest amount of support for the plan. All other provinces reported more than 50 per cent support, except Alberta, which only had 38 per cent of people in agreement.

Alberta also had the highest per cent of people who reported they "did not worry about climate change at all." Only 11 per cent of total respondents said they did not worry about climate change, but Alberta saw more than double that number at 27 per cent.

Looking long term, the country is split on whether or not they believe Canada is doing enough now to reduce the effects of climate change.

The Leger survey was conducted online from Nov. 5 - 7, with 1,565 Canadians over the age of 18 participating.

The margin of error is +2.48% 19 times out of 20.