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Lethbridge Bulls prepare for season opener against Okotoks Dawgs

Spitz Stadium is seen in an undated photo. (Facebook/Lethbridge Bulls) Spitz Stadium is seen in an undated photo. (Facebook/Lethbridge Bulls)
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The Lethbridge Bulls are gearing up for the WCBL team's 25th season.

Kalem Haney, 21, says he's ready to get back to work and reconnect with old teammates.

"I'm excited. There's a bunch of guys coming back from the past four years and buddies that I've played with since I was 12 years old.

"It will be nice to play with kids I've played with my whole life."

New head coach Ryan Macdonald has been with the club for neatly two decades, and says he's thrilled to celebrate Bulls' 25th anniversary.

"It's exciting," he said. "I've actually been with the Bulls since 2006, so this is my 19th year with them in some capacity, whether it's playing or coaching.

"Twenty-five years in this league is just awesome."

Players and coaches feel the team has a good mix of vets and young talent this season.

In 2023, the Bulls finished fourth in the West and fell in the first-round of the playoffs to the Sylvan Lake Gulls.

"We want to win a WCBL championship again," said Haney.

"I think we've brought in a lot of good players, brought back a lot of key returners, and brought in a lot of key new players that are going to play big roles for us through out the year."

It won't be the easiest start to the season for the Bulls, who will be playing their first nine games on the road.

Pitcher Cole Alguire says he feel up to the challenge.

"We're going to be a little bit short staffed, so it's going to be a bit of a fight at the start.

"We have confidence in ourselves and confidence in the guys we have. I'm sure we'll do great."

The Bulls kick off their 2024 season on Saturday, May 26 in Okotoks taking on the Okotoks Dawgs.

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