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Serial killer Robert Pickton, convicted in Calgary woman's death, sent to hospital after attack

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Robert Pickton is clinging to life in a Quebec hospital after being attacked on Sunday in prison.

He is serving a life sentence at the Port Cartier, Que., prison located north of Quebec City.

Correctional Service Canada says Pickton was attacked by another inmate on Sunday, resulting in life-threatening injuries.

That inmate is a 51-year-old man, according to Quebec police.

Pickton was convicted of six counts of second-degree murder after he was charged in the deaths of more than two dozen women, including many who disappeared from Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.

One of his victims was Brenda Wolfe.

She was born in Lethbridge and grew up in Calgary before moving to Vancouver.

Her daughter, Angel Wolfe, is studying to become a community health worker in Toronto.

"For me and my family, we feel that karma finally caught up to the man," Wolfe said.

"It's an outcome that I'd been praying for since I was a little girl and you have to understand, again, I don't wish ill on anybody, but he was a monster. He took my mother's life. So if he's going to lose his life now, you know what? Karma. Like I said."

Brenda Wolfe's daughter, Angel Wolfe, says her family feels 'karma finally caught up to the man.'

Wolfe reminisced on the times she spent with her mom when she was alive.

"We would always love going to the park, getting KFC, eating, having a little picnic in the park," she said.

"She loved music. She loved dancing with her girls, loved over-decorating for Christmas."

Pickton was sentenced in 2007 to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.

Given credit for pre-trial custody since his arrest in 2002, Pickton became eligible for day parole in February, with eligibility for full parole starting in 2027.

One criminologist at Mount Royal University says if Pickton survives, it's unlikely he will see parole.

"The chances of people like Pickton ever seeing outside the prison system is next to zero," Doug King said.

King says it's not surprising Pickton was attacked, following an ombudsman report last week suggesting assaults on inmates and prison staff at the federal level are surging.

"Violence within Canadian federal institutions is rising at an alarming rate," King said.

"It's a badge of honour within the institution, but also it's the notion of justice being delivered in a very different way by a very different group of people.

"It's something that we shouldn't condone."

With files from CTV News Vancouver 

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