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Children's consignment sale launches in Calgary Thursday

Families will be able to get some good deals on used children's clothes during an online sale in support of Calgary's Women In Need Society. (Supplied) Families will be able to get some good deals on used children's clothes during an online sale in support of Calgary's Women In Need Society. (Supplied)
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An online initiative kicks off Thursday in of support Calgary families and the Women in Need Society (WINS).

The Kids Fair children's pop-up consignment sale takes place online from April 18 to 21.

"We believe that Kids Fair offers a unique glimpse into how communities can come together to navigate economic hardships while preserving a spirit of giving," said organizer Linsay Smetaniuk.

Smetaniuk and co-owner Stephanie Agostinho are hoping to provide affordable shopping options for families, including half price Sunday, where thousands of items are marked down.

"(It) ensures that families save even more, allowing them to access premium children's products without straining their finances," the group said.

Caregivers, parents and grandparents will have the chance to list gently used children's items for sale, as well as shop.

"The event also serves as a medium through which consignors and buyers can donate items to WINS, supporting children and families."

Since the sale is online, organizers say it will be conducted a little differently than in-person markets.

"We inspect the sold items, package them and have one pickup spot and time for buyers," officials said.

When buyers come to pick up their purchases, they will also have the opportunity to support WINS with a direct donation and sellers can also support the society after the official sale wraps up.

"Consignors can donate items they didn't sell and everyone is welcome to bring items off the organizations wishlist, or purchase some of our items for donation."

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