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Fort Macleod town councillor charged in Coutts border protest steps down

Marco Van Huigenbos, a Fort Macleod town councillor, stepped down during Monday's council meeting ahead of his upcoming trial for charges in connection with the Coutts border protest. (File) Marco Van Huigenbos, a Fort Macleod town councillor, stepped down during Monday's council meeting ahead of his upcoming trial for charges in connection with the Coutts border protest. (File)
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A Fort Macleod town councillor who is set to go on trial for his role in the Coutts, Alta., border protest has resigned.

Marco Van Huigenbos made the announcement during Monday's council meeting.

"In the near future I face significant challenges, both personal and legal," Van Huigenbos said during the meeting.

"These challenges may indirectly cast our community and my role on council in a negative light. In consideration of this and my own personal convictions, I have made the difficult decision to resign as councillor."

He went on to say that it was a "privilege and honour" to serve the town for six-and-a-half years.

Van Huigenbos, along with fellow protesters Alex Van Herk and George Janzen, were both charged with mischief in connection with the protest that shut down traffic at the Coutts, Alta., border crossing in early 2022.

Police say the trio were key participants in the blockade.

The trial is expected to begin in April and Fort Macleod will hold a by-election for the vacant seat at a later date.

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